Wichita, Kansas
Not resolved
1.0
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15 comments

I was returning from a meeting at work with my new MacBook pro in hand and spilled some coffee on my desk. I set the Macbook down on my desk to clean up the spill, some coffee ran to the spot where I had laid the laptop down as I wiped my desk, and ever since my laptop has been very expensive paper weight.

When I called customer service I was first told that I could "walk in" to a certified applecare service center some 300 miles away as there were none in my immediate vicinity (I live in Wichita, KS metro population of 1,000,000) or I could send it in to them, but that required a payment of $1100 as Apple's warranty doesn't cover "liquid" damage and this was the cost to fix my computer.

I don't believe any of this is legal. I have literally spilled an entire cup of coffee into a couple of different Dell precision laptops and the only thing that happened was I needed a new $40 keyboard. I believe customers have a reasonable expectation that placing a laptop down on a desk with a little spilled coffee will not nuke their computer. Thus Apple is in violation of the implied warranty of merchantibilty.

Additionally, the notion that one must pay a flat fee repair cost prior to an actual determination of damage, or risk losing their Applecare warranty can not possibly be legal. The notion that I have to pay $1100 for a repair that might cost as little as $40 is again absurd and I believe illegal.

Reason of review: Warranty issue.

Monetary Loss: $2900.

Preferred solution: Let the company propose a solution.

Apple Cons: Service, Apple lack of customer support.

  • Warranty And Customer Service
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Anonymous
#992633

I sympathize with the poster and unlike some of the comments below, understand the claim they are trying to make. However, I think this is pretty obviously a pc user who misunderstood the nature Applecare coverage.

They are making an "apples to oranges" comparison. The reasonable expectations set by the implied warranty would be those of mac users, not pc users. While the extended warranties of pc manufactures (HP, Lenovo, Dell...) cover accidental damage; you couldn't, for example, call up Dell, complain that the latest version of "Word" won't let you read email attachments, and 'reasonably' expect Dell to do anything about it. It's a Microsoft problem.

But with Applecare they will help with precisely those type of problems.

Therefore I doubt any of the "reasonable expectations" and "implied warranty" claims will work here. Apple folks have one set of expectations, PC folk another.

Anonymous
#943801

So you're mad at apple because they won't fix a laptop that you damaged yourself? Applecare might cover accidental damage but I don't think it covers water/liquid damage.

And realistically, they can charge whatever they want. There's no law that says they can't charge more than a certain amount. If you don't want to pay so much for repairs then don't buy an expensive computer. If you're dishing out 1500+ on a notebook then you can't expect the repairs to only cost you "$40" you cheap f.uck.

And there's no need to throw around insults about someone's appearance.

What the f.uck do someone's piercings have to do with you getting your s.hit fixed. Next time take better care of your stuff.

Anonymous
#943816
@I hate entitled mac hipsters

What on earth on you talking about??? Who said anything about someone's appearance or piercings!?! The responses to this are getting increasingly bizarre.

Anonymous
#982319
@I hate entitled mac hipsters

Applecare protection plan for Mac computers does not cover any form of liquid or accidental damage.

Anonymous
#942867

Apple and their authorized dealers are free to charge whatever they want for repair. That being said, they are also probably the biggest bunch of crooks I have ever seen.

Spilled ice tea on mine. First I took it to and Apple store to try to get an estimate. I couldn't even drop it off for an estimate, you need to have an appointment. Best buy wanted $300 more to repair it than a new computer would cost.

Take a look on e-bay. there are several shops that will repair water damaged macs for a couple of hundred dollars and will refund your money if they can't.

Sent mine in a year and a half ago for a low cost repair and it has worked fine ever sense. Apple and their cohorts replace everything rather than fixing what is wrong...just a bad way of doing business and taking care of their customers.

Anonymous
#942862

Their policy is not illegal. You're the one who put your computer next to spilled liquid.

No company will fix or replace a device that you damaged yourself. It's pretty dumb to think otherwise. Apple is not breaking any laws. You're the one being ***.

And yes, I've spilled water on one of my machines too and paid to have it fixed. It was my fault, so I didn't complain.

Anonymous
#943201
@Anonymous

There are multiple issues here; one being the requirement that one has to pay a flat fee in advance of a determination of actual damage; the second concerns Apple's implementation of liquid sensors and their disabling of the machine. Additionally, contrary to your assertions, when one purchases extended warranty coverage from Lenovo or Dell, as Apple advertises their Applecare product, one is covered against accidental coverage.

I don't really see what name calling does to advance your point.

Anonymous
#943861
@Anonymous

"Apple's implementation of liquid sensors and their disabling of the machine." Do they really have those? Like, if liquid hits a sensor, it disables the entire computer??? Even if the liquid wouldn't otherwise cause any damage?

applehater
#1164084
@Anonymous

No ***, the LCI's tell Apple if liquid comes into contact with the computer and triggers them to go from white to red.

Anonymous
#934101

Start looking up these laws you think have been broken, you will need that information to sue Apple.

jaoneal
#934109
@Anonymous

A personal lawsuit would be absurd, as the legal fees would exceed the cost of laptop replacement. Class action would be the way to go, and Apple has already lost one class action case along these lines.

See: http://appleinsider.com/articles/13/05/28/apple-to-pay-53m-in-iphone-ipod-liquid-sensor-lawsuit-settlement

For a class action, we just need enough people willing to stand up to Apple.

The specific force of the implied warranty of merchantibility [Uniform Commercial Code: An implied warranty of merchantability is created when a merchant of goods sells those goods as being fit for the ordinary purpose for which such goods are intended.] will vary according to case law from state to state. Presumably, class action lawyers would know which state would be best to file in, although my guess is California.

Anonymous
#942863
@jaoneal

That suit was for a faulty sensor, not for idiots who poured water on their phones. Apple admitted to this and had a recall on this item. Maybe you need to learn how to read because it has nothing to do with what you think it does.

Anonymous
#943207
@Anonymous

Apple never issued a recall for the products, nor is it clear that the sensors were really 'faulty'. Rather what internal documentation from 3M indicated, among other things, was that non-accidental natural processes, such as condensation, could trigger the sensors. Again, I don't really see how the epithets are aiding your point.

jaoneal
#934140
@Anonymous

A personal lawsuit would be absurd, as the legal fees would exceed the cost of laptop replacement. Class action would be the way to go, and Apple has already lost one class action case along these lines.

See: http://appleinsider.com/articles/13/05/28/apple-to-pay-53m-in-iphone-ipod-liquid-sensor-lawsuit-settlement

For a class action, we just need enough people willing to stand up to Apple.

The specific force of the implied warranty of merchantibility [Uniform Commercial Code: An implied warranty of merchantability is created when a merchant of goods sells those goods as being fit for the ordinary purpose for which such goods are intended.] will vary according to case law from state to state. Presumably, class action lawyers would know which state would be best to file in, although my guess is California.

applehater
#1164086
@jaoneal

so I'll go crash my car and make BMW give me a new one right? That's how it works according to you.